The Best of the Worst: Bright Spots for Non-Playoff NFL Teams (Part 1)

I recently developed an opportunity to do some work for Mud, Sweat and Beers. It’s the sports blog for Match Pint, an online and mobile service in the United Kingdom, which shows sports fans what game is being televised in which pub, wherever they are, on their computer or via their iPhone.

The blog and service are mainly devoted to sports (mostly soccer) in the UK, but they also wished to branch out and start hitting on some American sports.

I think it was a swell idea.

My first entry (out of many, hopefully) is devoted to spotting the positives within this year’s non-playoff NFL teams. It’s a bit satirical, possibly upsetting, but probably entertaining.

So if you’re team didn’t make the playoffs this season, check out why I think all hope is not lost. Whether you agree with me or not, it’s likely to stir up some emotion. Laugh, cry, leave me comments (good or bad).

Part 1 covers the Chicago Bears, New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers and the Carolina Panthers.

Click right here to check it out.

And if you’re a soccer fan, be sure to check out the rest of their stuff.

As always, enjoy!

Three “QB-watches” more interesting than the 2013 “Tebow watch”

If your routine is anything like mine, you’ll wake up in the morning and start your day with a fresh batch of ESPN, whether it’s Sports Center or a click glance at the headlines on ESPN.com. Inevitably and unfortunately, that also means you’ll probably start your day with a fresh batch of Timothy Richard Tebow.

It’s no surprise that ESPN urges its employees to constantly discuss the Jets third-string “quarterback” considering America’s bizarre infatuation with him. He’s created a buzz in football that hasn’t been matched since, well, ever. And if you want ratings to go up, you give the people what they want, even if many others (like me) want up-to-the-minute Tebow coverage like we want a hole in our heads or kickoffs to be replaced by fourth and 15 at the 30.

But with recent news emerging that Tebow will ask to be traded or released after the conclusion of this season, he will be at the forefront of media attention once more amongst great speculation of where he might go and what team might benefit from bringing the Bible-bearing circus into town. I’m not sure where he might do any good but that’s because I couldn’t care less about the whole situation. He’s an average football player at best (his NFL stats show that) and he warrants as much attention any other third-string quarterback gets on a weekly basis, i.e. none.

Come the end of the 2012-2013 NFL season, there will be a few more interesting quarterback story lines that NFL fans should monitor instead of following Tebowmania: Part Deux, regardless if he ends up taking over for the pathetic Blaine Gabbert in Jacksonville next season.

Starting in the same locker room…

Mark Sanchez

There’s been a lot of speculation as to where Sanchez will play next season considering how bad he’s been. He would almost assuredly play somewhere else if it wasn’t for the guaranteed $8.25 million the New York Jets are due to pay him in 2013. There’s not a team in the league that should consciously decide to pay Sanchez that kind of money to be their quarterback — starting or backup. So will Gang Green give him starter money to ride the pine behind Greg McElroy or another QB TBD? Will they eat all of part of his contract to get him out of town and be rid of the bad voodoo and butt fumbles?

He’s been pretty awful but his body of work career-wise hasn’t been as bad. He has a 72.0 career quarterback rating, has thrown for 68 touchdowns, 68 INTs and is 33-28 as a four-year starter. He’s certainly not elite, but his career stats are still better than guys like Ryan Leaf or JaMarcus Russell, who were both drafted higher than Sanchez.

And in the postseason, his numbers are significantly BETTER. Sanchez is 4-2 in the postseason, leading his team to two NFC championship games in his first two NFL seasons, becoming only the second quarterback in NFL history to do so.

He’s shown that when he has adequate personnel around him, Sanchez can actually be a winning quarterback. Injuries and poor roster moves (cough-Tebow) narrowed the chances of success for Sanchez this season. Perhaps some roster changes or a trade elsewhere could reinvigorate Sanchez and salvage his career.

And if it doesn’t, at least he can say he dated Kate Upton, Jamie-Lynn Sigler and Eva Longoria.

Alex Smith

You really have to feel for Alex Smith. He spent his first five NFL seasons as a bottom-feeding quarterback, not once notching a winning season. When he was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers, analysts warned that his hands were too small to properly hold and throw an NFL football. (He didn’t quite dissuade this notion after throwing 27 interceptions and fumbling 21 times in his first two years with the 49ers.)

But when Jim Harbaugh took over as San Francisco’s head coach in 2011, he expressed confidence in Smith and immediately helped the embattled quarterback develop into a consistent game manager and more importantly, a winner. Smith led the 49ers to a 13-3 record and nearly took them to the Super Bowl if it hadn’t been for a red-hot New York Giants, which beat San Francisco in the NFC Championship game.

It was his first season with more than 3,000 passing yards and he set personal bests in just about every statistical category:pass attempts (445), completions (273), completion percentage (61.3 percent), passing yards (3,144), average yards per pass (7.1 yards per attempt), overall passer rating (90.7), rushing attempts (52), rushing yards (179) and total touchdowns scored (19). And he set these bench marks while throwing a league-low five interceptions.

In his first nine games this season, he continued his stellar play, throwing 13 touchdowns and five interceptions while completing 70 percent of his passes. But after being sidelined with a concussion in week 10, backup Colin Kaepernick took over and never relinquished the starting role. When he found out he had been delegated to a backup role, he said “I feel like the only thing I did to lose my job was get a concussion.”

And he was right.

Harbaugh has committed to Kaepernick like he committed to Smith in 2011 and that likely won’t change in 2013. But even though it seems that no quality play goes unpunished for Smith, he will certainly be a starter somewhere next season and it won’t be in San Francisco. Now that he’s a proven commodity in the most difficult role in team sports, there should be a handful of teams clamoring to sign the seven-year veteran. With a stink cloud emanating from under center in Arizona (no joke intended), there’s a chance Smith could head to the desert to play for Ken Whisenhunt and throw to Larry Fitzgerald.

Michael Vick

Michael Vick’s career went from being exciting and dynamic to non-existent and irrelevant, to exciting and dynamic (again) to non-existent and irrelevant (again). But if you’ve noticed the pattern, the next logical step should be, you guessed it, exciting and dynamic.

Sure he’s had trouble staying healthy in his past two seasons and he’s struggled to keep possession of the ball (he has 19 turnovers so far this year) but still, after all the issues he’s gone through both recently and in the distant past, Michael Vick is still an exciting player to watch and a possible solution somewhere to a team’s quarterback woes.

Remember that only two seasons ago, Vick was the AP and Sporting News NFL Comeback Player of the Year after going 8-3 as a starter, scoring 30 touchdowns (21 passing and nine rushing), throwing only six interceptions, and making the Pro Bowl for the fourth time in his career. Philadelphia’s offensive line has been unable to protect Vick in the past two seasons, so if he can find a team with a solid offensive line, he might be able to stay healthy and return to his Pro Bowl-form.

There’s an outside chance Vick could remain with the Philadelphia Eagles, but if head coach Andy Reid is fired at season’s end, it’s likely the following staff will either bring in a new quarterback or try to develop rookie quarterback Nick Foles. If so, Vick will be released and looking for a new home, which could be the Empire State according to some rumors. Regardless what happens to Vick, it’s highly likely he’ll start somewhere next season.

Fears of the ignorant American: Toronto edition

If you are a frequent visitor of my site, you know that everything I write about has to do with sports. I stick to what I know. But a friend asked me to write a post for him on his travel site about our trip to Toronto in 2011. Essentially, he wanted people to hear the story of my travel stupidity.

Never one to back down from a challenge, I wrote it for him and it is proudly on display at Madalapa’s Excursions.

Anyway, if you’re a fan of my writing or just want to see how poor of a traveler I am, click here to read Fears of the ignorant American: Toronto edition.

NHL lockout close to end…not so fast my friend.

This week, the NHL labor negotiations borrowed a page from ESPN college football personality Lee Corso’s book.

It looked like the NHLPA and owners were coming close to reaching an agreement and ending the inexcusable, unreasonable and unfathomable lockout this week. Optimism was surprisingly high on both sides. Multiple media outlets reported that the owners and players seemed close to an agreement. They met all day and into the following morning on both Tuesday and Wednesday. It seemed that the presence of moderate owners like Jeff Vinik of the Tampa Bay Lightning, Ron Burkle of the Pittsburgh Penguins, Mark Chipman of the Winnipeg Jets and Larry Tanenbaum of the Toronto Maple Leafs might have to doing some good to grease the wheels of appeasement on both sides of the puck.

Then on Thursday evening, the vibe seemed to fluctuate. The media began to tweet that the atmosphere no longer had the feeling of positivity, but then reported that NHLPA head Donald Fehr said, “We think there is a complete agreement on dollars. If that’s the case, and we think it is, there’s no reason to not have agreement.”

In hindsight, there was no good reason to trust what Fehr said, but sometimes when you want something so badly, all you see and hear is what you want to see and hear. So I read the words in front of me and began to feel hope, and even the hope of hockey is enough to get me through my day. It was slight, but it was a good feeling, one that I hadn’t had at all concerning these labor negotiations.

I updated my Christmas wish-list to read “1. NHL Game Center, 2. Penguins tickets, etc.” I glued myself to Twitter (since the NHL Network didn’t have the decency to broadcast any breaking news about the near future of its league) and kept my phone handy, ready to call my brother and father to rejoice about the saved season. Hell, I even thought I’d feel so good tomorrow I might get up early and start working out again. Now that the NHL was back, the world was my oyster and there was no limit to my potential!

As the evening negotiations came to a close, reporters waited for someone to take the podium and fill us all in on the days talks. Pittsburgh Tribune-Review columnist Dejan Kovacevic tweeted “You can tell even players have no idea what Fehr is going to say, what NHL response was. Makes for unreal drama in here.” And that was even palpable through the Twitter machine as I sat alone on my couch in my Brooklyn apartment. I was nervous, excited, doubtful, anxious and about 50 other emotions I can’t quite qualify with labels. I wanted it so badly. Then…

A dark cloud blew into midtown Manhattan and started raining ill will inside the Westin New York at Times Square. NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daley left a voice mail on Fehr’s brother Steve’s phone regarding the current proposal from the NHLPA. Kovecevic tweeted what the union head told reporters.

Fehr: “Advised in a voice mail that moves players made were not acceptable, that there was no reason for owners to stay.”

And just like that, everything went up in smoke and the collective hearts of NHL fans plummeted into our stomachs and shattered at the bottom like a faulty elevator.

This pretty much sums it up.

The grim reality was splattered on the wall. It appeared unlikely there would be an NHL season after this let down and all because of a three-year disagreement on contract term (NHL five years, PA eight years) and a two-year gap on CBA length (NHL eight years, PA six) . No, the season hasn’t been cancelled yet, and there still is time to save 40-50 games. But if you’re confident that the same guys blowing these negotiations now can save the season, I envy your optimism. Mine is drowning in melted ice and tears.

After the bad news was revealed, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman informed the media and public what happened with the labor negotiations on Thursday.

But to NHL fans Bettman’s address sounded more like the South Park presidential duck.

Partisan politics came back to the forefront and the fan constituency was forgotten, if it had ever been considered in the first place. The big wigs of hockey took one step forward then five steps back. Some owners told Bettman the process was over. Concessions came off the table. Bettman said it didn’t look like the two sides would be meeting soon, adding that he had no idea why Fehr said the two sides were close, and that was unfair to hockey fans.

Now, the next reasonable conclusion is for Cthulhu to exit his hibernation to cast the hockey world into darkness and despair for 5000 years.

Ok, maybe it’s not that bad but this situation is about the worst we could have asked for. It’s not too late to start following the NBA (sob) fellow puck heads, because following these labor negotiations is a slap in the face. We can’t trust Bettman or Fehr. We’re watching a bad movie where there are only villains and victims and the ending is starting to seem as predictable as 1997’s biggest blockbuster.

Hockey fans have been helpless through this whole process and now, as we watch our beloved game be torn limb from limb by greed and narcissism, all we can do is regret loving the game as much as we do and hope that we can forget our affection for the NHL or pray that the NHL will remember us.

The 2012-2013 NHL Season: What We’re All Missing Part 10

Even though the NHL is still locked out, we can all take solace in the fact that the NBA is a perfect substitute!

Glances across Canada, hears crickets, sees angry people in sweaters.

Yes, Canada I feel your pain. Especially people in Toronto. Here’s a few reasons I know you’re missing the NHL right now.

 

 

Leftwich can beat Ravens, needs big help from o-line

Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin announced Wednesday that Byron Leftwich will start Sunday against the Baltimore Ravens due to the injuries suffered by Ben Roethlisberger on Monday night against the Chiefs.

Roethlisberger was Pittsburgh’s team MVP up to this point – he’s thrown for 2,287 yards, 17 touchdowns, only four picks and has a quarterback rating of 100.0 –  so every Steelers fan should assume the Ravens will embarrass Pittsburgh in their bumblebee unis, throw their Terrible Towels into the trash and pray to god that the NHL lockout ends soon.

Steelers fans should panic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wait, no. They shouldn’t.

The Steelers offense is certainly disadvantaged without Big Ben, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they can’t beat the Ravens on Sunday. They have plenty of other playmakers who can move the ball and score points, but it will require the biggest team effort of the season from the biggest men on the team.

So far this year, the Steelers pass protection has allowed its quarterback some room to breath.The team has allowed 19 sacks in nine games, which ranks No. 7 in the NFL. Roethlisberger’s escapability certainly helped bolster that number, but he didn’t do it all on his own. The line must continue to protect the quarterback, especially because of Leftwich’s impression of a Hideo Nomo windup.

If they do give him time, there’s still the occasion for burner Mike Wallace to go deep for quick-strike scores, the play that he’s built a career around. When Leftwich is under center, “deep” gets even deeper. That’s the one advantage that Leftwich has over Roethlisberger; Lefty has an absolute cannon for an arm. This means big plays could still be in order if the timing is right.

To help set up the passing game, the Steelers MUST run the ball effectively, which they are more than capable of doing. To achieve this, the big men up front must duplicate their performances from earlier this season against the Giants, Redskins and Eagles. They helped a backfield of backups rush for 158, 140 and 167 yards, respectively in those games.

Isaac Redman and Jonathan Dwyer are good backs, but they don’t have the experience or raw talent to beat defenses by themselves the way guys like Adrian Peterson and Arian Foster can. It was the o-line that won Redman and Dwyer the majority of those yards in their best games and it’ll be the O-line that decides how well the offense performs in prime time at Heinz Field on Sunday night.

Against the Chiefs, there was a letdown by the offensive front as the Steelers rushed for only 95 yards. But they were going up against an abnormally stout Chief’s front seven who played their best game of the season. Pittsburgh Tribune Review reporter Joe Starkey reported that Pittsburgh offensive linemen said the Chiefs were calling out the Steelers plays before they ran them, suggesting they were familiar with Haley’s unaltered offense that he brought from his tenure at Kansas City. Expect a bounce-back game on Sunday from the big men because there’s a good chance they’ll have an easier time handling the Ravens defense.

As strange as it sounds, Baltimore ranks 26th in the NFL in run defense, allowing an average of 132 yards per game and about four yards per carry. They also rank 26th in the NFL in overall defense.

Yes, gone are the Sundays when men in purple struck the fear of god into quarterbacks and other offensive personnel.

They’re missing two of their biggest pieces in linebacker Ray Lewis and cornerback Lardarius Webb, who both suffered season-ending injuries earlier in the year. Even the top defenders who will take the field aren’t close to being healthy and executing at their highest level.  Linebacker Terrell Suggs hasn’t been close to duplicating his defensive MVP performance from a season ago since returning from an Achilles injury (10 tackles and one sack in three games) and future hall-of-fame safety Ed Reed just isn’t playing with the same lock-down consistency we’re used to seeing because of nagging shoulder, leg and neck injuries.

If the Steelers could pick a time to try and strike this Ravens defense, it’d be now. It just so happens that they won’t have Roethlisberger to do it. But show me a struggling and battered defense facing a strong offensive line and I’ll show you a 10-year veteran quarterback who can be successful against it.

Still worried about how Leftwich will play? It’s still a legitimate concern.

It’s tough to predict how effective Leftwich will be in his first start since Sept. 27, 2009 (in that game he was 7-16 for 22 yards and one interception in a scoreless loss against the Giants). He’s winless in his last six games as a starter and he hasn’t won since Oct. 8, 2006 while he was playing for the Jacksonville Jaguars. And against the Ravens, Lefty is 1-1 as a starter.

But it’s not like he’s is entering into a foreign offense and needs to figure out what the letters and numbers on his wristband mean. He knows the playbook and he’s taken plenty of snaps in practice all season long.

This isn’t Leftwich’s first rodeo.

He’s played in 59 NFL games and thrown for 58 touchdowns and more than 10,000 yards. Plus, he averages less than one interception per game. The cobwebs were dusted off when he came in cold against the Chiefs on Monday so he should be prepared to play at game speed.

And speaking of preparation, remember about nine months ago when Roethlisberger announced his wife was pregnant? It drew a lot of chatter in Pittsburgh because the due date would be around the time that the Steelers would face the Ravens. Odds were good that if Mrs. Big Ben had the baby on time, Mr. could miss a game against Baltimore. So what are the odds that Tomlin and offensive coordinator Todd Haley didn’t prepare for this scenario? The reasons might be different but the situation is still the same. There had to be a contingency plan.

Does Tomlin seem worried in this press conference Wednesday?

(Scoff) Next question.

Haley won’t have to alter the offense much with Ben out for the passing game to be successful. Tomlin said it himself that there will be only subtle changes in the offensive game plan. Haley will try to make it as easy as possible for Leftwich to hit open receivers so that probably means a lot of shorter passes and check downs, especially if they can get the run game going. If you’ve been paying any attention to the Steelers this season, you’ve heard the words “dink and dunk” about as much as you’ve seen commercials for beer, trucks and Cialis.

Haley’s offense doesn’t put a ton of pressure on the quarterback to make tight throws deep down field. It involves a lot of check downs and three-step drops. It was designed to get the ball out quickly so Roethlisberger would avoid getting hit too often and could stay healthy (ironically). But for the most part, it’s worked. It’s true that getting the ball out quickly isn’t Leftwich’s forte. But in terms of throwing underneath and checking the ball down to avoid a pass rush, he should be able to do an adequate job as long as the offensive line can give him time to drop back.

(Pittsburgh collectively gulps)

Have a little faith and trust that the Steelers and their veteran QB can pull this one out, because they certainly think they can.

No panic necessary.

The 2012-2013 NHL Season: What We’re All Missing Part 9

Florida’s voters may not have mattered in this year’s presidential election, but its hockey fans still do. Specifically in this instance, the Tampa Bay Lightning fans. What are they missing while the NHL owners and NHLPA battle with front lines of lawyers? Click here to head to the Sportz Broz and I’ll tell you.

The 2012-2013 NHL Season: What We’re All Missing Part 8

Kings fans, this is probably pretty rough for you right now. Every day that passes without hockey is another without a ring and banner ceremony at the first home game of the year. But if it’s any consolation (which it won’t be) the longer it takes for a season to happen, the longer you’ll get to hold onto the Cup.

But I know you just want to see your Kings play, and What We’re All Missing Part 8 details the reasons why.

The 2012-2013 NHL Season: What We’re All Missing Part 7

Just as the flesh of the living sustains the undead in fictional post-apocalyptic worlds (and apparently ex-Steeler Hines Ward sometime during this season of The Walking Dead), watching NHL hockey sustains puckheads throughout our real pre-apocalyptic society. So as we continue lurching about our world in tattered Lemieux and Gretzky sweaters, dragging our feet and moaning ominously while clawing at the faces of NBA fans, What We’re All Missing continues in full force on the Sportz Broz.

The latest edition focuses on the Winnipeg Jets.

Read. React. Enjoy.

A quick thought on Pittsburgh patience

We live in a right now, knee jerk, gotta have it yesterday, instantaneous society. It’s a fact that’s tough to argue against when fewer and fewer people are willing to wait a day for their news in a paper and prefer to get breaking information over their Twitter feed, whether it’s confirmed as true or not. It’s a reactionary culture that’s quick to condemn, redeem or otherwise forget anyone or anything that seems to impact our existence at any given time.

Because sports tend to be a large part of many of our lives, it’s not surprising how quickly we decide what the state of our teams are or will be in the near future.

A good example is the firing today of Los Angeles Lakers coach Mike Brown after FIVE games. Did he deserve it? Maybe, but it seemed like a knee-jerk reaction to say the least.

Or how about the Duke lacrosse scandal a few years ago? That team was condemned by the media and public for alleged sexual assault crimes, only to be pardoned after due process and ultimately forgiven.

As difficult as it may be and as frustrating as it sounds, everybody needs to slow down and take a breath. We must all wait a bit to gather our thoughts and let the world play out before we pound the gavel and execute or dismiss. And because of recent events in the Steel City, this is especially true for Pittsburgh sports fans.

Last Sunday, the Steelers executed their finest win of the season, defeating the Super Bowl champion Giants 24-20. And despite horrendous officiating, the Steelers dominated much more than the final score suggested. Eli Manning – the owner of two very large rings and two MVPs to go with them – was held to just 125 yards and completed only 10 completions on 24 attempts. The Giants passing game was stagnant. Their run game was stifled (the G-Men racked up only 68 yards on the ground).

Not only was it an outstanding defensive performance reminiscent of the Steel Curtain teams fans fondly remember, the black and gold also put together a sound performance on the offensive side of the ball. Ben Roethlisberger went 21-30 and threw for 216 yards, two touchdowns and one pick. Back-up running back Isaac Redman carried the ball 26 times for 147 yards and a touchdown. The offensive line opened up holes big enough to drive a garbage truck through. The pass game clicked. The run game cruised. Everything went to plan.

Just about every way you look at it, this game was in stark contrast to what the Steelers looked like through the first five games of the season. At that point, they were 2-3 and suffered brutal losses including two to the Raiders and Titans, two of the worst teams in the league. Pittsburgh ranked dead-last in rushing and the defense allowed an average of 23 points per game while blowing a number of fourth-quarter leads.

They just didn’t look like the Steelers. Had the Browns changed their colors to black and gold? Did Mike Tomlin and Dick LeBeau go on mental vacations?

But after leaving Tennessee with their tail between their legs following a 26-23 loss, it seemed like something started to click. The game plans looked better and the execution was far superior. They went into Cincinnati and shut down Andy Dalton and A.J. Green (who is a top-five receiver in the NFL this year). Pittsburgh trounced rookie phenom and the Redskins 27-12. They finally looked like the Steelers again and everyone’s doubts went out the window and started to drown at the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers.

But the problem is, there was never any reason to hit the panic button in the first place, even after losing to Oakland and Tennessee. Sure, the team looked out of sorts, but it was still quite early in the season and the rest of the AFC (minus the Houston Texans) looked no better. Pundits on national radio and television were killing the Steelers. Colin Cowheard of ESPN Radio said that the Steelers were too old defensively and they couldn’t produce well enough to be an upper-echelon team. Now the Steelers are 5-3, only one game back of first place in the AFC North and everyone is once again calling them contenders.

Here’s some advice to all fans and media: Avoid the waffling in the first place and wait until at least halfway through a season before declaring this or that about any team in professional sports. There’s something called a turnaround and we should all be well aware of it by watching the Giants the past few years. If they’ve taught us anything, it’s that all you have to do is make it to the postseason and then anything is possible.

Pirates fans learned this lesson the hard way over the last two years. The team started off their last two campaigns in excellent fashion. Both teams spent time in first place in the NL central division and it appeared that they would be locks to end 19- and 20-year losing skids. But both collapsed. We were all left wondering what happened and how it was possible. But it certainly was possible, if it wasn’t realistic, for both the 2011 and 2012 Pirates to blow up winning seasons because that’s sports. It’s not predictable in many cases for better or for worse. That’s what makes them great in the first place. Anything can happen.

And even now after Pirates owner Bob Nutting has decided that his inexperienced, sometimes hair-brained front office is staying intact, that doesn’t mean the team can’t have a winning season in 2013. Does it seem likely? Absolutely not. But stranger things have happened. I suppose it might be easier to expect the Pirates to be bad next season so that if we are surprised, it’s a pleasant one.

The same goes for the Penguins last year. With Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin, Kris Letang and Marc-Andre Fluery, we’ve come to expect greatness from the Penguins recently. Not just Pittsburghers either. Last season, Vegas had the Penguins pegged as the odds-on favorite to win the Stanley Cup. And after the regular season, it looked increasingly likely. The Pens finished second in the East and with Sidney Crosby finally healthy again and Evgeni Malkin having assumed the role of best player in the world, the only team that could beat the Penguins was the Penguins.But then they clashed with the Flyers in a less-than-heroic fashion and were defeated in six games. And entire season blew up in two weeks. Fluery, who had won a Cup in 2009, looked like Swiss cheeses as pucks easily found their way past him. Evgeni Malkin didn’t look the same as he did as the MVP in the regular season. Everyone let their expectations get the better of them because the Penguins were SUPPOSED to win. And should the NHL season happen this year, the Penguins are again the favorites to win it all.

Let’s just hold off on that judgement now.

Is it possible the Penguins and Pirates will collapse again? Yes. Is it likely? For the Penguins, no. For the Pirates. Maybe. But we shouldn’t engrave Sidney Crosby on the Cup yet and we shouldn’t fire Clint Hurdle before the season begins.

It’s best not to let any expectations get in the way of our sports. Just watch, listen and enjoy. Let the surprises work themselves out and let fate do what it does.

The 18th-century English poet Alexander Pope may have put it best when he said “Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.”

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